Know Yourself

You are likely to experience all sorts of fears in your study of martial arts.

That is OK.

Fear is often an expression of limitations we have imposed on ourselves.

For example everyone has a fear of falling down. That is why we practice breakfalls. Falling is taught to get through that fear. The feeling of accomplishment is extraordinary. Eventually students begin to believe that they can overcome their fears to move onto more challenging activities. As they begin to believe in themselves their train accelerates. They are no longer afraid to try.

Fear comes in many guises. Fear of failure is the greatest. Make no mistake you will fail. In fact you will fail many times. But take these occasions not as failures but practices to success. You will go home disappointed, frustrated, and angry full of doubt this happens in everyday life as well. By returning to practice you give yourself the chance to work through all those negative emotions and to ultimately succeed. This success transfers itself beyond martial arts and self-defense.

Emotions are very much a part of a martial artist’s life. You must come to grips with personal emotions, In combative situations emotions can be deadly. They cannot be banished completely but learn to be controlled. This is done through experienced know that it will take time to succeed.

Believing in yourself you will persevere. Don’t measure your progress against other students. Take pride in your accomplishments and recognize there are greater hurdles to overcome.

Mission Statement

The mission of the SHI RYU KAI dojo in serving the martial arts need of the community, is to:

  • Provide quality training in traditional martial arts
  • Provide worthwhile services at a fair and reasonable cost
  • Insure all students, parents, and guests a safe training environment free of fear, prejudice, intimidation or harassment regardless of age, sex, race, religion, sexual preference or disability

In achieving this mission, we will :

  • Consistently assist our students in achieving their goals.
  • Be a positive presence in the lives of our students and in the community at large.
  • Maintain our tradition of fairness, integrity, service, legitimacy, and longetivity.
  • Pursue excellence and innovation by continuously improving our programs and services through the effective use of all available resources.

This mission will be achieved through :

  • the dojo staff, parents, students and volunteers
  • supported by :
    • Shorinjiryu Genbukan Karate Federation
    • Karate Ontario
    • Artillery Park Aquatic Centre
Members are encouraged to participate in tournaments, and to attend seminars, training camps, and classes they are interested in.

Members can also belong to other martial arts associations and attend their events.

Copyright © 2000, SHI RYU KAI.
All Rights Reserved.

Five Animals

THE 5 ANIMALS and TEACHINGS of SHORINJIRYU KENKOKAN KARATEDO

 Dai Ikkyo (First Teaching)

The first teaching stresses the mental state of mizu no kokoro (mind of water), and movement of the tiger (tora no ugoki). This teaching stresses techniques such as the cat stance (neko ashi dachi) with a middle-level Guard (chudan kamae), and attacking movements such as the lunge punch (oi zuki) and the lunge front kick (oi mae geri).
Meikyo Shisui
When calm, the surface of water is clear like a mirror.

Dai Nikyo (Second Teaching)

Aiming for the mental state of hi no kokoro (mind of fire), one should copy the movement of the crane (tsuru no ugoki). As such, the crane stance (tsuru ashi dachi) with an upper-level guard (jodan kamae) is stressed, and the major attacking movements are the twist punch (hineri mae zuki) and the twist front kick (hineri mae geri).
Denko Sekka
Fire ignites from the sudden spark of two stones colliding.

Dai Sankyo (Third Teaching)

The third teaching stresses the mental state known as chi no kokoro (mind of the earth), and the movement of the bull (gyu no ugoki). A front stance (zenkutsu dachi) is emphasized, using a lower-level guard (gedan kamae). Basic attacking movements are the lead straight punch (okuri zuki) and the lead side kick (oi yoko geri).
*NOTE* Historically, the movement and strategy of the third teaching were based on that of the leopard (hyo). However, Kaiso Kori Hisataka made a personal study of the movement and strategy of the bull and emphasized this in his teachings. So Shihan Masayuki Kukan Hisataka followed this teaching and incorporated such movement and strategy into the third teaching for Shorinjiryu Kenkokan Karatedo.
Sekido Seizan
Through constant effort the earth creates mountains.

Dai Yonkyo (Fourth Teaching)

The fourth teaching emphasizes the mental state of kaze no kokoro (mind of wind), and the movement of the snake (hebi no ugoki). The basic stance is the open-leg defensive stance (sotobiraki jigotai dachi) with the versatile guard (hasso kamae). Attacking movements are the downward knifehand strike (shuto uchi otoshi) and twist roundhouse kick (hineri mawashi geri).
Furin Kazan
Wind in a forest moves with the sound of a volcano.

Dai Gokyo (Fifth Teaching)
The fifth and final teaching is the highest level teaching of karatedo as it stresses a mental state of simultaneous nothingness and completeness known as ku no kokoro (mind of air). The movement is based on the dragon (ryu no ugoki), and natural stances and postures are emphasized. The basic stance (shizentai dachi) with the natural guard (shizen kamae). Attacking motions are the backfist strike (uraken uchi) and the back wheel kick (ushiro kaiten geri).
Shikisoku Zeku
Emptiness is the oneness of color.

Reference Sources:
“Essential Shorinjiryu Karatedo”,
Copyright 1994 by Masayuki Kukan Hisataka

Protocol in the Dojo

The protocol we follow during our class is an expression of our interest in upholding Japanese tradition in our karate training.

Salutations are an expression of respect, gratitude, friendship, and appreciation.
Different Shorinjiryu dojo may perform more or less elaborate entering and leaving salutations in the dojo.

Conduct within Dojo:

Always bow before entering or when leaving the dojo and to your Sensei (Instructor) and fellow students.
Bowing is a Japanese custom for displaying respect, humility, and lack of arrogance.
It is not a matter of “bowing down” to a superior; you will notice, black belts bow to lower belts and vice versa. Some compare it to the military were soldiers will salute each other.
Perform a Formal standing bow facing Shomen, as a sign of respect for everything that the dojo means to us. Shomen is the front wall of the room; sho means “true” and men means “face”.
In some Japanese dojo, where the instructor is a follower of Shintoism, a kamiza , a miniature Shinto shrine, may be placed at the Shomen, making it into a somewhat reverent area for Shinto worship.
Alternatively according to the instructor’s religious belief, a Christian instructor may have a crucifix.
Other items might also include a hata (club flag), the dojo kun (school principles), a picture of the founder, a picture of the current Chief Instructor, also the national flag of Canada, or a provincial or municipal flag, or even the flag of Japan.
Training: Everyone must train both the body and mind.
Always participate with complete concentration, determination, spirit, and sincerity. Never fidget, yawn or look disinterested.
Listening:
Do not talk among yourselves or lean against the wall. Listen to what is being taught. When sitting, lower yourself into seiza position first; then relax and cross your legs in anza position. Be respectful and pay complete attention to the instructor and his/her teachings. If you are standing off to the side and are called upon; quickly acknowledge yourself, bow and move to a ready position with purpose and confidence. Never wander aimlessly about.
Conduct with Partner:
Everyone must treat his/her partner courteously and with proper etiquette. Always challenge your partner to a degree that is beneficial to his/her learning. Never patronize your partner but always remember your control.
Everyone participates in the cleaning of the dojo floor prior to the beginning of class.
Considering that we train barefoot and breathe in any dust that we may raise as we move about, the floor of the dojo must be cleaned prior to class.
Starting the Class Ending the Class
Senior instructs students to line up saying “seiretsu“.
When lining up, each person is to stand shoulder to shoulder with the person to their right. The line is to be as straight as possible.
When bowing, bring your heels together and point your toes in a 45 degree “V” position. Place the palms of your hands at the side of your thighs. Bow to approximately 20 degrees, while keeping your back straight. As you bow, your eyes must follow your bow. Never stare into your partners’ eyes as you bow. This shows disrespect and distrust.
Senior instructs students to line up saying “seiretsu“.
When lining up, each person is to stand shoulder to shoulder with the person to their right. The line is to be as straight as possible.
When bowing, bring your heels together and point your toes in a 45 degree “V” position. Place the palms of your hands at the side of your thighs. Bow to approximately 20 degrees, while keeping your back straight. As you bow, your eyes must follow your bow. Never stare into your partners’ eyes as you bow. This shows disrespect and distrust.
Senior instructs students to kneel one after the other by rank saying “seiza”.
From attention stance proceed left knee down first, then right knee, toes touching but not crossed. (remember,… Left behind)
Sit with a straight back, do not slouch or show fatigue, remain still.
Senior instructs students to kneel one after the other by rank saying “seiza”.
From attention stance proceed left knee down first, then right knee, toes touching but not crossed. (remember,… Left behind)
Sit with a straight back, do not slouch or show fatigue, remain still.
Senior instructs class to meditate by saying “mokuso“!
Senior instructs class to meditate by saying “mokuso“!
The Instructor will end meditation with a single clap of the hands and then by saying “mokuso yame“.
Instructor will end meditation with a single clap of the hands and then by saying “mokuso yame“.
All turn to the Shinzen
Senior says “Shinzen Ni Gasho”.”
All execute a single clap.
All look to the instructor
In the Kenkokan dojo, the instructor says the following which is repeated by all
Nichi getsu sei shin
Sun, moon, stars and mind.
Ten chi chin mei
Heaven, earth, god and life.
shuhai
Respect
All execute two claps.
Senior will say “(Shihan/Sensei/Sempai) ni keirei
all perform the kneeling ceremonial bow.
All turn to picture of “Kaiso
All look to the picture of “Kaiso
Senior says “Kaiso ni keirei
all perform the kneeling ceremonial bow.
Senior says “Kaiso ni keirei
all perform the kneeling ceremonial bow.
All turn to the instructor.
All look to the shinzen.
Senior will say “(Shihan/Sensei/Sempai) ni keirei
all perform the kneeling ceremonial bow.
Instructor says the following which is repeated by all
Nichi getsu sei shin
Sun, moon, stars and mind.
Ten chi chin mei
Heaven, earth, god and life.
shuhai
Respect
All execute two claps.
All turn to the center of the dojo.
All turn to the center of the dojo.
Senior will say “otagai ni rei
all perform the kneeling ceremonial bow.
Senior will say “otagai ni rei
all perform the kneeling ceremonial bow.
The instructor first rises from kneeling position, (remember,… Right up), then senior belt rises and the next rises and so on by rank.
The instructor first rises from kneeling position, (remember,… Right up), then senior belt rises and then the next rises and so on by rank.

Copyright © 2000, SHI RYU KAI.